Christmas – it’s all about the kids

I’d be the first person to agree that Christmas is a time for the kids. Of course, I also disagree that I’m too old for an advent calendar or that sitting at the front upstairs on a bus and pretending to drive is immature… That said I do get very much in touch with my inner child during December – if you call into the shop during the second half of the month I’m the one in a festive jumper, wearing reindeer antlers and jingle bells – and one of the best ways is by reading through some of the great children’s books available.  Old favourites like The Snowman or How The Grinch Stole Christmas come back every year (quite rightly) but sometimes a forgotten or neglected classic reappears. This year has been the turn of  The Invisible Child – a Moomin story by Tove Jansson – which has been reissued to raise money for Oxfam. This one is on my Christmas list because the Moomins is another thing I’m not too old for.

Books for the Smallest People (and no, I don’t mean elves…)

9781908745743One of my favourite jobs at work is reading stories to groups of little ones. I may not be a parent but I can do all the different voices required for the Gruffalo and I’m particularly proud of my rendition of What The Ladybird Heard – however, I also know that sometimes you just need to find a new book to read (no matter how much they love their favourite…). For those who loved Oi Dog! and Oi Frog! I can certainly recommend Oi Cat! (because rhymes are always good) and for little ones who are learning to count Ten Little Elves is educational, seasonal and fun. The ‘That’s Not My’ series is always a winner – and the latest volumes are cute and zeitgeisty since they involve unicorns and otters.

Books to take to Big School…

9781447277910There comes a moment when every youngster declares themselves too grown-up for picture books (even if they won’t let you throw out their copy of The Very Hungry Caterpillar) and they discover the delights of books with chapters. Although most of them still have lots of pictures and many seem to be written by off duty pop stars and comedians.  Children this age (5ish to 8ish) seem to love series – there seems to be a never-ending supply of Beast Quest or Daisy Meadows titles – so if you find a character they love there should be plenty to read. If you’ve not tried them yet though have a look at the Goth Girl or Ottoline stories by Chris Riddell – wonderful marriages of fun stories and quirky illustrations with strong heroines. Also this is a great age to discover the joys of Paddington. Just saying…

Booty for Bookworm Boys and Girls

9780141986005As usual we have new titles from favourite authors David Walliams, Jeff Kinney and Jacqueline Wilson to keep 9 to 12 (ish) year-olds quiet on Christmas morning but if you are looking for a new direction I’ll be suggesting Matt Haig again this year – the first two books in his Christmas series are now in paperback and the new hardback looks at how hard it is to be the child of Father Christmas and his wife, Mary… Funny and heart-warming with a dash of peril – what more do you need? And remember lots of youngsters have yet to discover the joys of Harry Potter – start them on the paperbacks or go straight for the glorious illustrated editions. I’m quite jealous to think that there will be youngsters reading about Hogwarts for the first time…

9780241253588Let’s not forget that some children may prefer to get a non-fiction book under the tree. From the evergreen Guinness World Records to The Lost Words (a gloriously beautiful illustrated book of ‘spell-poems’ designed to reintroduce a new generation to the wonders of nature) there is plenty to choose from. Junior palaeontologists may enjoy the Dinosaurium and both boys and girls will be fascinated by the lives described in Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. Hopefully all the adult shoppers will enjoy ‘researching’ for presents too!

Teens/Young Adults/ Those of us who don’t want to be grown up…

9780857561091Most of the youngsters I buy Christmas presents for are now in the ‘young adult’ category and, as I’m sure you know, they can be tricky to buy for. Mine (nieces and nephews) would rather have cash than most gifts but that doesn’t feel right to me but luckily they are mostly keen readers. Books by Vloggers and Youtubers seem to go down well in this age group and there is still lots of love for old favourites like Wreck This Journal but there also plenty of more traditional fiction options. A new John Green will be welcome in many quarters and older teens should enjoy One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus but, I hope, many of them will be settling down to our book of the year. La Belle Sauvage is a brilliant return to the world of His Dark Materials but, because its storyline runs parallel to that of the original trilogy, it can also be read as an introduction to Pullman’s world of dust and daemons. The only problem will be getting it out of the hands of the adults…

Jane

 

 

 

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Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls – Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo

Sometimes I forget that I’ve tried sweet-talking a publisher into letting me have a book to review until the book turns up. Maybe its my age but I keep running out of space in my head to keep all the things I’m meant to remember – sometimes this is a bad thing (when I get home and realise I didn’t remember to get any milk) but when books I was quite excited to hear about show up unexpectedly then it is definitely a Good Thing…

9780141986005The Good Thing that turned up today was a book which came out of a hugely successful Kickstarter campaign – a collection of beautifully illustrated short biographies of inspirational women. It is aimed at young girls, from 5 or 6 upwards, but I could see it being a useful resource for older children looking for information for history projects (I am going to be googling so many  of the women and girls whose stories are outlined here) and it would be good reading for boys too. The women/girls in this book are queens, warriors, scientists, mathematicians, athletes, artists and politicians. I loved the fact that while girls are being encouraged to push into male dominated fields credit is also given to girls in more traditionally ‘girly’ roles – singers, models and ballerinas for example. The message really is that girls can do, and be, whatever they want. There is plenty of diversity too – the girls seem to be from every continent, every ethnicity and there are girls who don’t let disability stand in their way. They have been giving the patriarchy a run for its money for 2,000 years – if our current generation of girls read this book then we should be able to continue to build on their work. Some of the stories told in these pages bought a tear to my eyes but they all made me proud to be female.

Jane